Cell density of a defined medium that contains the maximum non-inhibitive concentration of nutrients

Value ~15 g (dry weight)/liter
Organism Bacteria Escherichia coli
Reference Shiloach J, Fass R. Growing E. coli to high cell density-a historical perspective on method development. Biotechnol Adv. 2005 Jul23(5):345-57. p.348 3rd paragraphPubMed ID15899573
Primary Source Lee SY. High cell-density culture of Escherichia coli. Trends Biotechnol. 1996 Mar14(3):98-105.PubMed ID8867291
Method Primary source abstract: "Various high cell-density culture (HCDC) techniques have been developed for growing recombinant and non-recombinant E. coli strains in fed-batch cultures at concentrations greater than 100 grams (dry cell weight) per liter. This article reviews the problems encountered in HCDC of E. coli, and discusses various solutions. Feeding strategies for HCDC of E. coli, and the results obtained using them, are also described."
Comments P.348 3rd paragraph: "It is well established (Riesenberg et al., 1991) that nutrients such as glucose at a concentration of 50 g/l, ammonium at 3 g/l, iron at 1.15 g/l, magnesium at 8.7 g/l, phosphorus at 10 g/l and zinc at 0.038 g/l inhibit E. coli growth. A defined medium that contains the maximum non-inhibitive concentration of nutrients allows growth of E. coli to a cell density of about 15 g/l dcw (primary source)." Note-Counter-intuitively, the cell density (and the OD) that can be reached when maximal not-inhibitive concentration of nutrient is supplied is lower than cell density when lower concentrations of nutrient are given. To get higher cell densities (54-190 g/L, BNID 104943) lower concentrations of nutrient are actually needed.
Entered by Uri M
ID 105323